Female Rothschild's Giraffe #1
Female Rothschild's Giraffe #1

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Chestnut Mandibled Toucan Raiding a Woodpecker Nest
Chestnut Mandibled Toucan Raiding a Woodpecker Nest

Many people don’t realize that toucans are opportunistic omnivores. They do eat fruits and nuts, but also are notorious amongst Costa Rican locals for raiding the nests of other birds, snatching up eggs and even baby birds. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Sleepy Squirrel Monkey
Sleepy Squirrel Monkey

This squirrel monkey took a short break from foraging and closed its eyes for a few moments on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Resplendent Quetzal in Avocado Tree
Resplendent Quetzal in Avocado Tree

This male resplendent quetzal, one of the most famous of Central American birds, sits here in an avocado tree waiting for his mate to arrive. These magnificent birds adorn flags, have national currencies named after them (Guatemala), and are the subject of ancient folklore, dating back to pre-Colombian era Central America. This photo was taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Scarlet Macaw - Landing in Style
Scarlet Macaw - Landing in Style

A scarlet macaw lands gracefully in the treetops on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

A Mother's Love
A Mother's Love

A baby white faced capuchin clings to its mother’s back in Costa Rica. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Cape Buffalo - Murchison Falls
Cape Buffalo - Murchison Falls

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Black Spiny Tailed Iguana
Black Spiny Tailed Iguana

Amongst the most common of Osa Peninsula reptiles, the black spiny tailed iguana may be photogenic, but has attitude! This big male has occupied the same tree for the last two years, scaring off any rivals with that gaping mouth and aggressive head banging. Taking in Carate, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Pootoo on Its Nest
Pootoo on Its Nest

This pootoo spent nearly three weeks on this perch guarding its nest and eggs. In Spanish, this bird is known as pajaro palo, translated as “stick bird,” for its incredible camouflage. Taken on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Two Toed Sloth Taking a Nap
Two Toed Sloth Taking a Nap

This two toed sloth happened to fall asleep in a great pose for this photograph. Taken on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Squirrel Monkey or Forest Elf?
Squirrel Monkey or Forest Elf?

Often called the "elves of the Costa Rican rainforest," squirrel monkeys are agile, playful, and intelligent.  The smallest of the four primate species living in Costa Rica, it is believed that they first made their way to Central America as pets of traders and/or indigenous nomads.

Young Female Elephant #1
Young Female Elephant #1

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Spectacled Caiman Guarding her Waterhole
Spectacled Caiman Guarding her Waterhole

This spectacled caiman, a relative of the alligator, guards her muddy waterhole on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. A year ago she had a brood of babies which she vigilantly guarded. This year, they’ve all grown big enough to leave their mother’s care, leaving her alone at this stream near Rio Piro. Taken in Rio Piro, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Toucan Salute
Toucan Salute

This toucan was all about making a scene on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati
White Nosed Coati

This White Nosed Coati paused for a moment from its hunt for buried land crabs to check out the camera. Taken in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Scarlet Macaw-Look Into My Eye
Scarlet Macaw-Look Into My Eye

Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.  March 2018.

Young Elephant
Young Elephant

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Motherly Love
Motherly Love

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Look At My Teeth!
Look At My Teeth!

This white faced capuchin reveals his sizable chompers in a threat display. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Frogling in Metamorphosis
Frogling in Metamorphosis

On this juvenile frog, you can see its tadpole tail still nearly completely intact, and its newly formed legs.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake
Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake

This Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake was extended out over a trail near Corcovado National Park in Costa Rica.  The snake was spotted during a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey being conducted by the conservation NGO Frontier. Taken January 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Squirrel Monkey Portrait
Squirrel Monkey Portrait

Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Hummingbird in Flight
Hummingbird in Flight

Taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Relaxing Howler Monkey
Relaxing Howler Monkey

A mantled howler monkey relaxing at midday near Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  Taken February 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Frog Eggs About to Hatch
Frog Eggs About to Hatch

Hanging from a leaf about three meters above a stream, this gelatinous frog's nest was filled with wriggling tadpoles awaiting to be mature enough to emerge from their mucous covered eggs.  This was a sight we had been seeking for weeks, and to discover this nest at such a stage of development was a real treat.  Observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Two Granular Glass Frogs on a Leaf
Two Granular Glass Frogs on a Leaf

These two granular glass frogs were observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati on a Palm Frond
White Nosed Coati on a Palm Frond

This white nosed coati was part of a troupe of around 16 individual animals that were making their way through the canopy just above the NGO Frontier's jungle camp around sunset. Taken February, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Gladiator Tree Frog on Leaf
Gladiator Tree Frog on Leaf

A Gladiator Tree Frog observed during a nighttime Amphibian and Reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hungry Boa Constrictor
Hungry Boa Constrictor

This medium sized boa constrictor snuck into Frontier Base Camp's chicken coup late one night.  I awoke from the sounds of distressed chickens, and upon opening the coup, I observed this boa about to strike at one of the chickens.  I let the chickens out, retrieved my camera, and was able to take several photos of the snake before it slithered back into the brush, without getting a chicken dinner.  Taken February, 2017 in Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Faced Capuchin on Patrol
White Faced Capuchin on Patrol

This white faced capuchin descended low into the canopy near the Frontier base camp in Carate, Costa Rica. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Smoky Jungle Frog
Smoky Jungle Frog

This large Smoky Jungle Frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Female Golfo Dulce Anole
Female Golfo Dulce Anole

This female Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hunting Tamandua
Hunting Tamandua

This Northern Tamandua moved through the canopy with very little grace in the lower canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  The Tamandua have no teeth, and depend upon their powerful gizzards for breaking down their insect diet.  They have partially prehensile tails which they use to help them climb and balance on tree limbs as they use their powerful claws to dig for ants and termites. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Small Headed Tree Frog
Small Headed Tree Frog

This small headed tree frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hungry Spider
Hungry Spider

This spider eating its prey was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Geoffroy's Spider Monkey Hanging and Snacking
Geoffroy's Spider Monkey Hanging and Snacking

This female Geoffrey's Spider Monkey, also known as a black handed spider monkey, was observed on an afternoon primate survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Yellow Crowned Night Heron
Yellow Crowned Night Heron

A Yellow Crowned Night Heron fishing for crayfish on the Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Taken May 2016. Photo by Ben Blankenship

White Nosed Coati Eating a Crab
White Nosed Coati Eating a Crab

This troupe of Coatis were collectively digging for land crabs when we came across them in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  They were incredibly bold and not skittish at all around people.  Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hummingbird Feeding
Hummingbird Feeding

Taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Photogenic Gladiator Tree Frog
Photogenic Gladiator Tree Frog

This gladiator tree frog took a special interest in my camera flash, staring straight into the camera lens for its portrait.  The gladiator tree frog gets its name from the male's characteristic barbs on its hind legs which it uses to battle other males for mating rights with females.  Battles are sometimes to the death.  It was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Camouflaged Golfo Dulce Anole (Male)
Camouflaged Golfo Dulce Anole (Male)

This Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Geoffroy's Spider Monkey with a Stogie
Geoffroy's Spider Monkey with a Stogie

This Geoffrey's Spider Moneky, also known as a black handed spider monkey, was observed on a primate survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. This female is eating the tender young branches of a wild almond tree, making it appear as though she has a stogie in her mouth. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Sleepy Eyed Granular Glass Frog
Sleepy Eyed Granular Glass Frog

This granular glass frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Brazilian Wandering Spider eating Basilisk Lizard
Brazilian Wandering Spider eating Basilisk Lizard

The Brazilian Wandering Spider, also known as the Banana Spider for its proclivity for lying its eggs in bananas, holds the Guinness World Record for being the most venomous spider in the world.  It's venom is so potent that some victims die even after receiving anti-venom.  Another bizarre characteristic of the Brazilian Wandering Spider's venom is its blood vessel dilating properties, which can cause men who are bitten to suffer from painful and lasting erections.  This characteristic has led to some pharmaceutical companies researching this venom on the quest for the next viagra. This large and aggressive spider is very common in Costa Rica. This individual was observed on the outer wall of a cabin at Frontier's Base Camp as it consumed this young basilisk lizard. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Grooming White Faced Capuchins
Grooming White Faced Capuchins

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures. Grooming is a daily part of life for Capuchins who use it as a means of strengthening social bonds.  These two juveniles were observed just outside the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bare Hearted Glass Frog
Bare Hearted Glass Frog

Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism. The bare hearted glass frog is considered to be the most transparent of all of the glass frog species.  This individual was smitten with the camera flash.  After this image was taken, the frog jumped onto the camera lens, crawled up onto the flash, and then jumped onto my face.  Taken March, 2017. Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Harlequin Beetle
Harlequin Beetle

This bizarre and beautiful Harlequin Beetle was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati Sniffing for Leftovers
White Nosed Coati Sniffing for Leftovers

This troupe of Coatis were collectively digging for land crabs when we came across them in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  They were incredibly bold and not skittish at all around people.  Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Gladiator Tree Frog Close-Up
Gladiator Tree Frog Close-Up

This large gladiator tree frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The gladiator tree frog gets its name from the male's characteristic barbs on its hind legs which it uses to battle other males for mating rights with females.  Battles are sometimes to the death.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship. 

Colorful Grasshopper
Colorful Grasshopper

This large grasshopper was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile White Face Capuchin
Juvenile White Face Capuchin

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures. This juvenile was observed just outside the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bare Hearted Glass Frog on a Leaf
Bare Hearted Glass Frog on a Leaf

This Bare Hearted Glass Frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism.The bare hearted glass frog is considered to be the most transparent of all of the glass frog species. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Anole with a Grip
Golfo Dulce Anole with a Grip

The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica. This female Golfo Dulce Anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Stoic White Faced Capuchin
Stoic White Faced Capuchin

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures.  This individual was observed as it descended from the high canopy near the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Owl Butterfly on a Leaf
Owl Butterfly on a Leaf

This enormous and beautiful example of an Owl Butterfly was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Tungara Frog Calling
Tungara Frog Calling

The sound of this frog's call sounds very similar to the sound of an old video game laser sound effect.  In fact, the first time I heard its call, I believed it to be emanating from my cell phone.  Upon research online though, we learned the calls were being emitted by the Tungara Frog, sometimes apparently nicknamed, the video game frog. This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile Geoffroy's Spider
Juvenile Geoffroy's Spider

This very young spider monkey was very curious about my camera as we observed it and its mother in the canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Olive Tree Frog showing Mottled Pattern
Olive Tree Frog showing Mottled Pattern

The Olive Tree Frog is a master of camouflage, and can adjust its skin color from bright orange to green to mottled brown.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bell-Shaped Mushrooms
Bell-Shaped Mushrooms

As the wet season approaches in Costa Rica, the forest floor blooms with a wide array of fungi.  These beautiful little bell shaped fungi were most often found growing on decomposing logs. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Yellow Hornet
Yellow Hornet

This Yellow Hornet was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green and Black Poison Dart Frog
Green and Black Poison Dart Frog

The Green and Black Poison Dart Frog's name is derived from the historical practice of indigenous peoples harvesting its poison and using it to coat their darts and arrows for hunting.  The very small amount of poison the frog possesses is enough to make a human heart stop beating. However, like most poison dart frogs, the green-and-black poison dart frog only releases its poison if it feels threatened. This individual was observed in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica, on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green Parrot Snake
Green Parrot Snake

The Green Vine Snake is a rear-fanged snake, meaning it has two large teeth in the upper rear of its skull.  After biting prey in the head, the snake lifts the animal 20-40 cm off the ground and emits a toxic saliva into the wound which helps immobilize the prey.  This individual was observed on the beach just outside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Clumsy Tamandua
Clumsy Tamandua

This Northern Tamandua moved through the canopy with very little grace in the lower canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  The Tamandua have no teeth, and depend upon their powerful gizzards for breaking down their insect diet.  They have partially prehensile tails which they use to help them climb and balance on tree limbs as they use their powerful claws to dig for ants and termites. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog Adult
Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog Adult

The highly endangered Golfo Dulce poison dart frog advertises its poisonous nature with brightly colored markings from its nose down its back. Like all poison dart frogs, Golfo Dulce poison frogs have highly potent neurotoxic poisons in their skin. While it is only the fourth-most toxic of the genus, the Golfo Dulce poison frog is still a highly toxic animal. Its poison causes severe pain, followed by seizures and paralysis if a large enough dose of the toxin is administered.  This adult individual was observed inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Northern Cat Eyed Snake I
Northern Cat Eyed Snake I

The Northern Cat Eyed Snake is a frog assassin.  It's excellent camouflage and mild venom make it a perfect hunter of arboreal frog species.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Forlorn Spider Monkey
Forlorn Spider Monkey

This adult Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  It's body position and "sad-looking" eyes gave me an impression of forlornness. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Great Curassow I
Great Curassow I

The Great Curassow is a very large, pheasant like bird, which is currently listed as threatened by the IUCN Red List.  It was once heavily hunted in Costa Rica for its meat, but like all terrestrial animals in Costa Rica, it is now protected from hunting.  Taken inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Flying Spider Monkey
Flying Spider Monkey

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed leaping from tree to tree inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green Sea Turtle Spitting
Green Sea Turtle Spitting

This Green Sea Turtle was observed in the tidal pools of the Big Island in Hawaii.  As it surfaced, it spit water from its mouth before submerging itself again.  Taken June, 2011.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Spider Monkey by the Tail
Spider Monkey by the Tail

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed hanging by its tail from a tree limb inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Munching Spider Monkey
Munching Spider Monkey

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed foraging in the the canopy inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Great Curassow II
Great Curassow II

The Great Curassow is a very large, pheasant like bird, which is currently listed as threatened by the IUCN Red List.  It was once heavily hunted in Costa Rica for its meat, but like all terrestrial animals in Costa Rica, it is now protected from hunting.  Taken inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile Basilisk Lizard (AKA Jesus Christ Lizard)
Juvenile Basilisk Lizard (AKA Jesus Christ Lizard)

This female common basilisk lizard was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The common basilisk lizard earns its nickname, the Jesus Christ lizard, from its ability to run across the surface of water to evade predators. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Northern Cat Eyed Snake II
Northern Cat Eyed Snake II

The Northern Cat Eyed Snake is a frog assassin.  It's excellent camouflage and mild venom make it a perfect hunter of arboreal frog species.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Anole on a Leaf II
Golfo Dulce Anole on a Leaf II

This Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Female Rothschild's Giraffe #1
Chestnut Mandibled Toucan Raiding a Woodpecker Nest
Sleepy Squirrel Monkey
Resplendent Quetzal in Avocado Tree
Scarlet Macaw - Landing in Style
A Mother's Love
Cape Buffalo - Murchison Falls
Black Spiny Tailed Iguana
Pootoo on Its Nest
Two Toed Sloth Taking a Nap
Squirrel Monkey or Forest Elf?
Young Female Elephant #1
Spectacled Caiman Guarding her Waterhole
Toucan Salute
White Nosed Coati
Scarlet Macaw-Look Into My Eye
Young Elephant
Motherly Love
Look At My Teeth!
Frogling in Metamorphosis
Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake
Squirrel Monkey Portrait
Hummingbird in Flight
Relaxing Howler Monkey
Frog Eggs About to Hatch
Two Granular Glass Frogs on a Leaf
White Nosed Coati on a Palm Frond
Gladiator Tree Frog on Leaf
Hungry Boa Constrictor
White Faced Capuchin on Patrol
Smoky Jungle Frog
Female Golfo Dulce Anole
Hunting Tamandua
Small Headed Tree Frog
Hungry Spider
Geoffroy's Spider Monkey Hanging and Snacking
Yellow Crowned Night Heron
White Nosed Coati Eating a Crab
Hummingbird Feeding
Photogenic Gladiator Tree Frog
Camouflaged Golfo Dulce Anole (Male)
Geoffroy's Spider Monkey with a Stogie
Sleepy Eyed Granular Glass Frog
Brazilian Wandering Spider eating Basilisk Lizard
Grooming White Faced Capuchins
Bare Hearted Glass Frog
Harlequin Beetle
White Nosed Coati Sniffing for Leftovers
Gladiator Tree Frog Close-Up
Colorful Grasshopper
Juvenile White Face Capuchin
Bare Hearted Glass Frog on a Leaf
Golfo Dulce Anole with a Grip
Stoic White Faced Capuchin
Owl Butterfly on a Leaf
Tungara Frog Calling
Juvenile Geoffroy's Spider
Olive Tree Frog showing Mottled Pattern
Bell-Shaped Mushrooms
Yellow Hornet
Green and Black Poison Dart Frog
Green Parrot Snake
Clumsy Tamandua
Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog Adult
Northern Cat Eyed Snake I
Forlorn Spider Monkey
Great Curassow I
Flying Spider Monkey
Green Sea Turtle Spitting
Spider Monkey by the Tail
Munching Spider Monkey
Great Curassow II
Juvenile Basilisk Lizard (AKA Jesus Christ Lizard)
Northern Cat Eyed Snake II
Golfo Dulce Anole on a Leaf II
Female Rothschild's Giraffe #1

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Chestnut Mandibled Toucan Raiding a Woodpecker Nest

Many people don’t realize that toucans are opportunistic omnivores. They do eat fruits and nuts, but also are notorious amongst Costa Rican locals for raiding the nests of other birds, snatching up eggs and even baby birds. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Sleepy Squirrel Monkey

This squirrel monkey took a short break from foraging and closed its eyes for a few moments on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Resplendent Quetzal in Avocado Tree

This male resplendent quetzal, one of the most famous of Central American birds, sits here in an avocado tree waiting for his mate to arrive. These magnificent birds adorn flags, have national currencies named after them (Guatemala), and are the subject of ancient folklore, dating back to pre-Colombian era Central America. This photo was taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Scarlet Macaw - Landing in Style

A scarlet macaw lands gracefully in the treetops on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

A Mother's Love

A baby white faced capuchin clings to its mother’s back in Costa Rica. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Cape Buffalo - Murchison Falls

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Black Spiny Tailed Iguana

Amongst the most common of Osa Peninsula reptiles, the black spiny tailed iguana may be photogenic, but has attitude! This big male has occupied the same tree for the last two years, scaring off any rivals with that gaping mouth and aggressive head banging. Taking in Carate, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Pootoo on Its Nest

This pootoo spent nearly three weeks on this perch guarding its nest and eggs. In Spanish, this bird is known as pajaro palo, translated as “stick bird,” for its incredible camouflage. Taken on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Two Toed Sloth Taking a Nap

This two toed sloth happened to fall asleep in a great pose for this photograph. Taken on the Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Squirrel Monkey or Forest Elf?

Often called the "elves of the Costa Rican rainforest," squirrel monkeys are agile, playful, and intelligent.  The smallest of the four primate species living in Costa Rica, it is believed that they first made their way to Central America as pets of traders and/or indigenous nomads.

Young Female Elephant #1

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Spectacled Caiman Guarding her Waterhole

This spectacled caiman, a relative of the alligator, guards her muddy waterhole on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. A year ago she had a brood of babies which she vigilantly guarded. This year, they’ve all grown big enough to leave their mother’s care, leaving her alone at this stream near Rio Piro. Taken in Rio Piro, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Toucan Salute

This toucan was all about making a scene on Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati

This White Nosed Coati paused for a moment from its hunt for buried land crabs to check out the camera. Taken in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Scarlet Macaw-Look Into My Eye

Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.  March 2018.

Young Elephant

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Motherly Love

Taken in Murchison Falls National Park, Uganda. July 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Look At My Teeth!

This white faced capuchin reveals his sizable chompers in a threat display. Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Frogling in Metamorphosis

On this juvenile frog, you can see its tadpole tail still nearly completely intact, and its newly formed legs.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake

This Brown Blunt Headed Vine Snake was extended out over a trail near Corcovado National Park in Costa Rica.  The snake was spotted during a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey being conducted by the conservation NGO Frontier. Taken January 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Squirrel Monkey Portrait

Taken in Carate, Costa Rica. December 2018. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Hummingbird in Flight

Taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Relaxing Howler Monkey

A mantled howler monkey relaxing at midday near Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  Taken February 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship

Frog Eggs About to Hatch

Hanging from a leaf about three meters above a stream, this gelatinous frog's nest was filled with wriggling tadpoles awaiting to be mature enough to emerge from their mucous covered eggs.  This was a sight we had been seeking for weeks, and to discover this nest at such a stage of development was a real treat.  Observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Two Granular Glass Frogs on a Leaf

These two granular glass frogs were observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati on a Palm Frond

This white nosed coati was part of a troupe of around 16 individual animals that were making their way through the canopy just above the NGO Frontier's jungle camp around sunset. Taken February, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Gladiator Tree Frog on Leaf

A Gladiator Tree Frog observed during a nighttime Amphibian and Reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hungry Boa Constrictor

This medium sized boa constrictor snuck into Frontier Base Camp's chicken coup late one night.  I awoke from the sounds of distressed chickens, and upon opening the coup, I observed this boa about to strike at one of the chickens.  I let the chickens out, retrieved my camera, and was able to take several photos of the snake before it slithered back into the brush, without getting a chicken dinner.  Taken February, 2017 in Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Faced Capuchin on Patrol

This white faced capuchin descended low into the canopy near the Frontier base camp in Carate, Costa Rica. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Smoky Jungle Frog

This large Smoky Jungle Frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Female Golfo Dulce Anole

This female Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hunting Tamandua

This Northern Tamandua moved through the canopy with very little grace in the lower canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  The Tamandua have no teeth, and depend upon their powerful gizzards for breaking down their insect diet.  They have partially prehensile tails which they use to help them climb and balance on tree limbs as they use their powerful claws to dig for ants and termites. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Small Headed Tree Frog

This small headed tree frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hungry Spider

This spider eating its prey was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Geoffroy's Spider Monkey Hanging and Snacking

This female Geoffrey's Spider Monkey, also known as a black handed spider monkey, was observed on an afternoon primate survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Yellow Crowned Night Heron

A Yellow Crowned Night Heron fishing for crayfish on the Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Taken May 2016. Photo by Ben Blankenship

White Nosed Coati Eating a Crab

This troupe of Coatis were collectively digging for land crabs when we came across them in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  They were incredibly bold and not skittish at all around people.  Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Hummingbird Feeding

Taken in San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica, February 2019. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Photogenic Gladiator Tree Frog

This gladiator tree frog took a special interest in my camera flash, staring straight into the camera lens for its portrait.  The gladiator tree frog gets its name from the male's characteristic barbs on its hind legs which it uses to battle other males for mating rights with females.  Battles are sometimes to the death.  It was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Camouflaged Golfo Dulce Anole (Male)

This Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Geoffroy's Spider Monkey with a Stogie

This Geoffrey's Spider Moneky, also known as a black handed spider monkey, was observed on a primate survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. This female is eating the tender young branches of a wild almond tree, making it appear as though she has a stogie in her mouth. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Sleepy Eyed Granular Glass Frog

This granular glass frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Brazilian Wandering Spider eating Basilisk Lizard

The Brazilian Wandering Spider, also known as the Banana Spider for its proclivity for lying its eggs in bananas, holds the Guinness World Record for being the most venomous spider in the world.  It's venom is so potent that some victims die even after receiving anti-venom.  Another bizarre characteristic of the Brazilian Wandering Spider's venom is its blood vessel dilating properties, which can cause men who are bitten to suffer from painful and lasting erections.  This characteristic has led to some pharmaceutical companies researching this venom on the quest for the next viagra. This large and aggressive spider is very common in Costa Rica. This individual was observed on the outer wall of a cabin at Frontier's Base Camp as it consumed this young basilisk lizard. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Grooming White Faced Capuchins

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures. Grooming is a daily part of life for Capuchins who use it as a means of strengthening social bonds.  These two juveniles were observed just outside the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bare Hearted Glass Frog

Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism. The bare hearted glass frog is considered to be the most transparent of all of the glass frog species.  This individual was smitten with the camera flash.  After this image was taken, the frog jumped onto the camera lens, crawled up onto the flash, and then jumped onto my face.  Taken March, 2017. Carate, Costa Rica. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Harlequin Beetle

This bizarre and beautiful Harlequin Beetle was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

White Nosed Coati Sniffing for Leftovers

This troupe of Coatis were collectively digging for land crabs when we came across them in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  They were incredibly bold and not skittish at all around people.  Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Gladiator Tree Frog Close-Up

This large gladiator tree frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The gladiator tree frog gets its name from the male's characteristic barbs on its hind legs which it uses to battle other males for mating rights with females.  Battles are sometimes to the death.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship. 

Colorful Grasshopper

This large grasshopper was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile White Face Capuchin

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures. This juvenile was observed just outside the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bare Hearted Glass Frog on a Leaf

This Bare Hearted Glass Frog was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Glass frogs get their name from their characteristic translucent skin which allows them to better blend in with whatever surface they are sitting on as a defense mechanism.The bare hearted glass frog is considered to be the most transparent of all of the glass frog species. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Anole with a Grip

The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica. This female Golfo Dulce Anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Stoic White Faced Capuchin

Of the four primate species in Costa Rica, the white faced capuchin is the crowd favorite, due to its intelligence, curiosity, and human-like behavior.  They are complex creatures who can use tools and have in depth social structures.  This individual was observed as it descended from the high canopy near the Frontier Base Camp in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Owl Butterfly on a Leaf

This enormous and beautiful example of an Owl Butterfly was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Tungara Frog Calling

The sound of this frog's call sounds very similar to the sound of an old video game laser sound effect.  In fact, the first time I heard its call, I believed it to be emanating from my cell phone.  Upon research online though, we learned the calls were being emitted by the Tungara Frog, sometimes apparently nicknamed, the video game frog. This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile Geoffroy's Spider

This very young spider monkey was very curious about my camera as we observed it and its mother in the canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Olive Tree Frog showing Mottled Pattern

The Olive Tree Frog is a master of camouflage, and can adjust its skin color from bright orange to green to mottled brown.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken April, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Bell-Shaped Mushrooms

As the wet season approaches in Costa Rica, the forest floor blooms with a wide array of fungi.  These beautiful little bell shaped fungi were most often found growing on decomposing logs. Taken May, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Yellow Hornet

This Yellow Hornet was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green and Black Poison Dart Frog

The Green and Black Poison Dart Frog's name is derived from the historical practice of indigenous peoples harvesting its poison and using it to coat their darts and arrows for hunting.  The very small amount of poison the frog possesses is enough to make a human heart stop beating. However, like most poison dart frogs, the green-and-black poison dart frog only releases its poison if it feels threatened. This individual was observed in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica, on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green Parrot Snake

The Green Vine Snake is a rear-fanged snake, meaning it has two large teeth in the upper rear of its skull.  After biting prey in the head, the snake lifts the animal 20-40 cm off the ground and emits a toxic saliva into the wound which helps immobilize the prey.  This individual was observed on the beach just outside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Clumsy Tamandua

This Northern Tamandua moved through the canopy with very little grace in the lower canopy of Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  The Tamandua have no teeth, and depend upon their powerful gizzards for breaking down their insect diet.  They have partially prehensile tails which they use to help them climb and balance on tree limbs as they use their powerful claws to dig for ants and termites. Taken August, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Poison Dart Frog Adult

The highly endangered Golfo Dulce poison dart frog advertises its poisonous nature with brightly colored markings from its nose down its back. Like all poison dart frogs, Golfo Dulce poison frogs have highly potent neurotoxic poisons in their skin. While it is only the fourth-most toxic of the genus, the Golfo Dulce poison frog is still a highly toxic animal. Its poison causes severe pain, followed by seizures and paralysis if a large enough dose of the toxin is administered.  This adult individual was observed inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Northern Cat Eyed Snake I

The Northern Cat Eyed Snake is a frog assassin.  It's excellent camouflage and mild venom make it a perfect hunter of arboreal frog species.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Forlorn Spider Monkey

This adult Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica.  It's body position and "sad-looking" eyes gave me an impression of forlornness. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Great Curassow I

The Great Curassow is a very large, pheasant like bird, which is currently listed as threatened by the IUCN Red List.  It was once heavily hunted in Costa Rica for its meat, but like all terrestrial animals in Costa Rica, it is now protected from hunting.  Taken inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Flying Spider Monkey

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed leaping from tree to tree inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Green Sea Turtle Spitting

This Green Sea Turtle was observed in the tidal pools of the Big Island in Hawaii.  As it surfaced, it spit water from its mouth before submerging itself again.  Taken June, 2011.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Spider Monkey by the Tail

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed hanging by its tail from a tree limb inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Munching Spider Monkey

This male Geoffrey's Spider Monkey was observed foraging in the the canopy inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. Taken August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Great Curassow II

The Great Curassow is a very large, pheasant like bird, which is currently listed as threatened by the IUCN Red List.  It was once heavily hunted in Costa Rica for its meat, but like all terrestrial animals in Costa Rica, it is now protected from hunting.  Taken inside Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. August, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Juvenile Basilisk Lizard (AKA Jesus Christ Lizard)

This female common basilisk lizard was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The common basilisk lizard earns its nickname, the Jesus Christ lizard, from its ability to run across the surface of water to evade predators. Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Northern Cat Eyed Snake II

The Northern Cat Eyed Snake is a frog assassin.  It's excellent camouflage and mild venom make it a perfect hunter of arboreal frog species.  This individual was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula.  Taken March, 2017.  Photo by Ben Blankenship.

Golfo Dulce Anole on a Leaf II

This Golfo Dulce anole was observed on a nighttime amphibian and reptile survey conducted by the NGO Frontier in Carate, Costa Rica on the Osa Peninsula. The Golfo Dulce anole gets its name from El Golfo Dulce, the gulf that separates the Osa Peninsula from mainland Costa Rica.Taken March, 2017. Photo by Ben Blankenship.

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